Students will watch two films to help them understand the utility of case management services. Students must watch the films and engage in self-reflection and critical analysis of the issues presented throughout the films.

Students will watch two films to help them understand the utility of case management services.

 Movie Reflection  (3-4 Pages) 150 points

Students will watch two films to help them understand the utility of case management services. Students must watch the films and engage in self-reflection and critical analysis of the issues presented throughout the films. Use APA format and the follow the rubric posted on Blackboard. The films are:

The Waiting Room: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzIin6OVoLU

 

Living in tents: for rent at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FDMQMDH

 

Guide for Writing a Movie Review

Each person could find what he or she needs in a movie: humor, adrenaline, drama, love, a journey back through time, or an alternative reality. So, writing a movie review seems to be one of the most interesting assignments for most students. However, enjoying a good film in the evening and watching it solely for the purpose of writing a review are not quite the same. This article is aimed to teach you how to avoid common mistakes and how to write an excellent movie review.

What Is a Movie Review

Generally, a movie review is a genre of art criticism and journalism. It is a complex overview, usually made by a professional critic, on films that have just been released, to help decide what film to watch.

Professional reviews differ from those made by amateurs; they are more structured, sharper, more detailed, but at the same time more compact in wording. In a professional movie review you will always find awareness of the film’s director(s), their previous works and previous filmmaker’s pictures, as well as a deep understanding of different film genres and classics for each of them, and filming techniques and modern trends.

Though, you can find a lot of reviews that are made by ordinary movie fans — and sometimes they can end up being more informative and useful than a professional one.

Movie Review Purpose

The key to writing an outstanding movie review is understanding its purpose. So, keep your goals in mind while writing:

  • Discuss the film plot briefly. Share some information about characters, relations and events, but don’t tell the whole story. Reading the review shouldn’t replace watching the film. Yet, you are free to mention the most important moments or turning points that make the film worth watching.
  • Analyze the film in general and in certain aspects, such as the acting, the work of the director, theme, music, and special effects. Make a conclusion if the main idea of the film was duly implemented. Try to be objective and detailed in your evaluations.
  • Share your opinion. Describe your feelings during, and after watching the movie and specify what you liked, and what you didn’t like. Provide your general impression about the film based on examples, descriptions, and comparisons to enable readers to make their own decisions.
  • Give a recommendation. Try not to be categorical, but let your readers know what they can expect from the film, and who might find it interesting. Say if it matches an official film description and declared genre, why it might be worth watching, and what its weaknesses are.
  • Entertain the reader. Reading movie reviews is actually kind of fun in itself. We’ve, as a society, gotten used to using this option before choosing a film to watch. Try to make an easy-to-read review, and write in an interesting manner.

Step-by-Step Guide on How to Write a Movie Review

Writing a movie review may not be as challenging as it first appears. This type of academic assignment is not the most complicated one by far. However, it still has its own peculiarities – and if you can get these right, you will succeed.

To get started with your paper, you need to know and understand the main characteristics of a good movie review:

  • It provides bibliographic information;
  • It shares a clear but concise characterization of the movie in question;
  • It includes a description of the plot, which, however, does not give away any spoilers;
  • It identifies the key characters and actors;
  • It identifies the setting, themes, conflicts, in addition to other details present in the movie and evaluates them;
  • It compares the film to other similar ones;
  • It identifies the key strong and weak points of the film;
  • It gives an overall evaluation of the movie.

Also, another important thing to be aware of in order to understand how to start a movie review is the proper formatting of such an assignment. The key to success in handling your movie review is decent organization. Just like every other academic paper, a good film review essay should follow a specific structure, style, and, most importantly, formatting.

Here are the key takeaways for how to format your paper:

  • Use 1-inch margins on all sides;
  • Pick a clear and readable font (the preferred fonts are Times New Roman, Courier, and Bookman);
  • Set the font size to 12 pt.;
  • Center the title of the paper along with your name.

Finally, to succeed in writing a movie review, all you need to do is follow the right sequence of actions that will gradually bring you to your desired result. In this section of our article, we are going to share a detailed step-by-step guide for how to write a film review.

Choose a Film

If you have a choice, think carefully about what film you would like to analyze. Surely most of us would choose one of our favorites. Though, it’s not obligatory to write a review on tone of the films you like, you may write about one you don’t like, and explain why. Such an approach could be different and refreshing, and could bring you extra credit.

Watch the Movie

Even if you’ve seen it a hundred times, watch it again in order to discover new details, and to understand the characters and their motives betters. We recommend watching a film at least two, or better yet three times. While watching it for the first time, we usually concentrate on the main heroes, their storyline and emotions. The second time around usually helps you to notice the details of minor characters and their stories, such as music, timelines, costumes, decorations and locations. All these things contribute to how you perceive the movie and your critique.

Make Notes

Keep a paper and pen near you to write down things you notice in the film, or to note your ideas while watching, or right after it. Write your notes immediately once an idea comes to mind.

Research the Movie

Filming is a long and complicated process that involves many people, which usually makes the shooting process an interesting story in itself. Find out as much as possible about it. Is it an original scenario, a re-telling or a remake? Is the plot based on a book? What was the available budget? How has the cast changed in the process? Pick up two or three of the most impressive facts about production and share them in your work.

Analyze the Movie

Think about everything you saw in the movie and determine your impressions of the film. Does the picture involve any social context? What was the original idea for the film and how successful were the producers at implement them? Pay attention to how it was filmed and and what techniques were used. For example, in Psycho, produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock, we can definitely notice an unusual zoom effect called vertigo. Think of which actor impressed you the most and why. Compare this role with his or her previous works. Discuss the movie you’ve chosen with your friends or family to get fresh ideas to support your opinion, or for another point of view.

Draft a Review Outline

A plan is always a good idea, and could lead to half of your success. Before writing the actual movie review, make an outline of your work to structure all your thoughts and arguments. Read further to get an example of a movie review outline.

Come up with a Catchy Title

“My review for Titanic” sounds boring. Think of intriguing or impressive title, like “Why taking a cruise is not always a good idea”. Make your readers want to read further.

Write Your Review

Now after you’ve done your research and prepared your work, it’s time to compose everything together and write a review. Put all your thoughts and arguments together and stick to the outline you wrote before. Make a general overview of the film so that readers are able to understand what problems might arise from it, but don’t spoil the outcome, as they might not have seen the movie yet. Write main points that you liked, and ones that you didn’t. Reinforce your thoughts with evidence and examples. Comment on the originality of the movie and compare it with other films of the same genre, films with the same topic, or films directed by the same person.

Edit Your Final Draft

Once you’ve written your review, take a rest. A little pause before a final reading and editing will help you to look at it with a fresh outlook. Read your work several times. Check for spelling errors, grammatical mistakes, the sequence of presentation, compliance with the outline and professor’s demands, and the format and style.

Movie Review Outline

Structuring is extremely useful in any type of paper and a movie review isn’t an exception. A written outline will help you organize your thoughts properly, not to forget anything and to actually end up writing it faster. Here is an example outline you may use:

  • Introduction: In this part you need to provide some general information about the picture: title, release date, main actors, filmmakers, film company and filming budget.
  • Summary of the story: This is a short exposition of movie plot, characters and their interaction.
  • Analysis of the movie, that includes:
  • Analysis of the plot elements: starting point, rising action, and climax.
  • Analysis of creative elements: dialogues, characters, use of colors, camera techniques, mood, tone, symbols, costumes or anything that contributes or takes away from the overall plot.
  • Analysis of the topic and its implementation: viewers’ understanding of the topic, relevance of the topic, and comparison with other resembling works.
  • Opinion. Your point of view supported with examples and facts from the story.
  • Conclusion. Announce whether the filmmaker was successful in his/her purpose. Explain how the motion picture was helpful in providing a deeper understanding of the course topic.

Short Movie Review Form

If you are in the middle of writing a movie review one-off, then reading our comprehensive guide and following the tips and steps mentioned here should be enough to get an excellent grade. However, what if you know that you will be writing plenty of reviews in the future? In this case, we recommend that you create a standardized movie review form (aka template) that will help you save time and succeed in your future assignments.

Format and structure your template according to the general rule of film review writing and leave empty text boxes. Alternatively, you can search for a template on the Internet and save even more time.

Mistakes to Avoid

Here are some common mistakes among students that we recommend you avoid.

  • Retelling the film plot in detail. As we mentioned above, the idea of a movie review is not to put the film on paper—nobody likes spoilers. Share the general plot to make your reader curious about seeing the film in order to get their personal opinion.
  • Giving a too general opinion of the film. Remember that things are rarely unequivocal. Even if you don’t like the content and quality of the film, don’t forget to mention if the music was actually pretty good, or if one of the actors managed to portray a believable character.
  • Lack of evidence. Presenting your opinion without any explanation why you think that way won’t be considered reliable. The unfounded statement isn’t a good resource for a decision, even if we are talking about a choice of which movie to watch.
  • Lack of film research. Don’t force your readers to conduct their own research, or to look for another review to find out the background information of a movie.
  • Absence of structure. If your work is not structured properly, it will be really difficult to follow your thoughts and understand your points. Reviews should be helpful to readers, and good structure helps get your message across correctly.
  • No conclusions and recommendations. As we mentioned above, providing recommendations regarding the film is one of the main purposes of writing a movie review. Do not deprive readers from your findings and thoughts. By advising a good movie to watch, you may make someone’s evening.

Movie Review FAQ

Am I Required to Write a Film Review in a Specific Formatting Style?

Typically, the formatting style of the movie review is determined by the specific assignment instructions provided by your teacher. In some occasions, a movie review may be free of academic formatting. However, you should double-check this with your teacher.

Can I Copy a Movie Review from the Internet and Submit It as My Own?

No – if you simply copy an existing review and submit it as your own, your teacher will detect plagiarism in your paper and will penalize you for it. However, you still can search for examples of movie reviews on the Web to get ideas for how to write your own. Instead of taking the risk, entrust your movie review to one of our professional academic writers. This way you will save your time, without giving up on your success!

How Do You Write a Movie Criticism?

In a nutshell, a movie criticism is a peer-reviewed academic paper that analyzes and evaluates movies and the film medium. This concept is often used interchangeably with that of a film review. Therefore, when writing a movie criticism, you may as well follow the same steps and tricks as defined in this article for how to write a movie review.

What Are Good Movies to Write About?

Basically, you can write a movie review on pretty much any film. However, we advise to be very careful with these choices. It is important that you pick a movie that you will be able to analyze and evaluate. Typically for a movie review, students choose films they either like or don’t like.

What Makes a Movie Great?

There are several key things that define whether a film is good or not, these are: the plot, the visual aesthetics, the quality of directing and acting, the impression it makes on the audience, etc. Generally, you can tell a specific movie is great when it keeps the audience engaged and able to follow the story, and then leaves them with a powerful impression and then something to think about once the credits roll.

 

 

 

 

 

Discuss an event (something that happened to you) that had an effect on the person you are today.  What was the event, why did it happen and how did it impact/change you?  What did you learn from this experience?  Please be detailed in your discussion and try to reach the 500-word requirement.  You may go over 500 words.

Discuss an event (something that happened to you) that had an effect on the person you are today.  What was the event, why did it happen and how did it impact/change you?  What did you learn from this experience?  Please be detailed in your discussion and try to reach the 500-word requirement.  You may go over 500 words.  Remember that in writing a narrative the more you personalize it the more powerful it reads so use the pronoun I.

Composition Exercise Directions
I’ll score your composition exercise on a 4-point scale with a point for format, a point for content, a point for focus and a point for clarity.

For your two composition exercises please write:

1. (format) a 500-word composition.  Use Courier New, 12-point font and double space and MLA style.

2. (content) Your composition needs a main idea and specific details that support your response to the topic.  Support comes from examples from your life, stories or what you’ve read and researched.

3. (focus) Stay focused on the topic.  Everything you write should have a connection to the topic and your ideas.

4. (clarity) When you proofread check for common errors like fragments, run-on’s, commonly confused words, tense shift, subject-verb disagreement, spelling, etc.  Try to adhere to the KISS Principle.  This means keep your sentences short and simple and divide your composition into short, easy to read paragraphs.  For a 500-word composition you should have between six and eight paragraphs.

Life Changing Event: Essay Introduction

In life, certain experiences present challenges that change the way people relate to themselves and their families. Certain life events mark life-changing moments that alter lives either positively or negatively. It matters how people handle their relationships at such critical moments.

Life Changing Experience: Essay Main Body

Relationships, especially with family members, are the most important aspects of handling change. I have experienced such life-changing events that changed me into a better person.

One such event occurred in my childhood, while the other one occurred in adolescence. In both cases, my family was there to support and help me go through the tough times. Looking back at the influence of these events, I am always glad that my family was with me in overcoming the challenges. I am now a better person because my family stood beside me and gave me strength and support in moments of weakness and helplessness.

The first event that had a remarkable impact on my life was the loss of a dear friend. This event not only changed my world but also made me a better person. It taught me how to appreciate friends, family, and relationships. In childhood, I had a cousin who was my best friend.

Our friendship was so deep that we usually spent holidays and weekends visiting each other’s family. To my family, she was like one of the members. On the other hand, I was like one of the members of her family. We used to spend a lot of time together, to play, to study, to travel, and doing many other fun activities.

One day, while returning home from school, she got knocked down by a motorcyclist who was speeding off trying to escape from a police officer. She was hit from behind and upon landing on the ground, knocked her head on a large stone on the side of the road. When I received the news of the accident, I was devastated.

The morning after the accident, I visited her in hospital and received the sad news that she was in a coma after suffering severe brain damage. I lost appetite, could not sleep for weeks, and spent several nights crying and wishing that she would be fine. She was in the hospital for six months. During that period, I became stressed and lost weight.

I missed school for many days, thus affecting my academics. Even though my family was affected, too, the effect was greater on me because of our long-time friendship. Every day I woke up expecting to hear good news from my parents of her miraculous recovery, but that did not happen. As I became more depressed, I started to avoid social gatherings and experienced difficulty sleeping.

One morning, just after breakfast, we received news that she had passed away. At that moment, a hot flush of blood flowed into my head, and I fainted. The long period of endless waiting had come to an end. That morning was one of the lowest moments. I was rushed to the hospital, and doctors said that I had collapsed due to sudden shock. The grieving period was very painful.

However, my family stood by me and offered consolation. My family members offered emotional and physical support and helped me to get over the incident. The event had serious emotional effects. My mum spent most of her time comforting me. I was able to cope with the situation because my family understood what I was going through, were patient with me, listened to me, and offered psychological help.

My parents were not angry at me for missing school. They allowed me to stay home until a time when I was ready to go back. It took four months of grieving to get over the death of my cousin and best friend. This incident changed my life and brought me closer to my family. I now appreciate relationships, and more. As a result, I am more loving, caring, compassionate, and appreciative of the people in my life.

The other defining moment that changed me involved a disagreement with my parents regarding joining high school. When the time came for me to join high school, I was not prepared and wanted to stay home for a year before joining. My parents were concerned that I would lose a year of schooling since, at my age, I was not ready for a job. They were afraid that I would have nothing to do for an entire year.

The reasons for the decision to delay my entry to high school were fear, anxiety, and uncertainty. I was not ready to enter a stage of life where I was expected to be responsible for my life and actions. I refused to talk to my parents and other family members because I felt that they were imposing their principles on me. The truth is that I was afraid to enter a phase that would require me to be responsible for my decisions and actions.

I avoided my parents and always made sure that they never got a chance to question me. My decision changed when my dad confronted me. Our discussion focused on the reasons that were informing my decision. At first, I was unwilling to tell dad the truth, but as the discussion progressed, I had no other choice but to open up to him. I was afraid that he would be disappointed with me.

However, he assured me that it was normal to experience fear and anxiety, especially when one is about to make a life-changing decision. He narrated me a story about how he had reacted the same way when his dad asked him to move out of their family house in order to find a place to live after joining college. Throughout the entire experience, my family was very understanding.

They helped me to overcome the fear and anxiety of embracing responsibilities. That incident changed my life, attitudes, and perspectives regarding life. My family has always supported me during tough times. That incident improved my relationship with my family and introduced me to adulthood. Whenever I face a challenge, I discuss it openly with my family because of the awareness that they are always ready and willing to listen and offer assistance.

Life Changing Event: Essay Conclusion

My elder brother introduced me to high school life and offered numerous tips on how to adjust to the new environment. My family is my greatest source of joy and happiness. This incident taught me responsibility, trust, humility, and the importance of family. The aforementioned events changed my life tremendously because they played a key role in molding me into a responsible, caring, and compassionate person.

Reference

StudyCorgi. (2022, June 6). Life Changing Events: Personal Experience. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/life-changing-events-personal-experience/

Compare Gilgamesh and Odysseus as to their heroic qualities, noting similarities and differences, using specific examples from the epics.

Assignment 2: Project Paper – Comparative Essay

Due Week 8 and worth 200 points

This “Assignment 2” writing assignment is a comparative essay focused on topics encountered in our HUM 111 class. The project will be based on research but will reflect your views and interpretation of the topic. This project is designed to help you stretch your mind and your abilities as an organized, innovative, and critical thinker. If approached properly, it should also be fun!

Choose one (1) of the topics from the list of topic choices below. Read the topic carefully. Write a three to four (3-4) page paper (750-1,000 words) that follows instructions and covers each part of the topic. (The title page and References list do not get included in this word count).

Note: Your instructor may require you to submit your topic choice for approval before the end of Week 5.

For the topic you choose:

Establish a clear thesis about your topic as part of the introductory paragraph (often the thesis is the last thing one determines after doing the basic research and outline; however it will be placed in the first paragraph of your paper).
This is a comparative essay. Comparison approached properly will require some critical thinking on your part. Use a point-by-point approach for the essay. That means, if comparing subject A with subject B, don’t do the first half of the essay on subject A and then the second half on subject B–that will seem like two (2) separate essays and comparisons will tend to get lost. Instead, you should be mentioning both subjects in most of your paragraphs as you compare them throughout the essay. Comparisons will identify similarities as well as contrasts.
Do not try to do everything on your two (2) subjects. You should end up narrowing your focus to a few insights and issues about the subjects being compared. And, from those fairly specific points of comparison, you will develop a thesis and glean some lessons.
Follow closely the instructions below for your specific topic.
Include a concluding paragraph at the end. This paragraph will, in some way, refer back to the thesis established in your first paragraph, since now you have demonstrated and supported it. It may be here that you also include your observations relating your study to the modern workplace or society (see your topic). Try to finish with flair!
Use at least three (3) good quality academic sources, with one (1) source being the class text. Note: Wikipedia and other similar Websites do not qualify as academic resources. You are highly encouraged to use the Resource Center tab at the top of your Blackboard page.

Topic Choices – Choose just one (1) of the topics below:

Qualities of the Hero: Comparing Gilgamesh and Odysseus. Write an essay comparing these two (2) heroic figures from ancient epics of different cultures, especially focusing your analysis on the sources about their encounters with monsters: Gilgamesh encounters the monster guarding the forest, Humbaba, in Tablets 3-5 of the Epic of Gilgamesh (see http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/mesopotamian/gilgamesh/; scroll down to the Tablet links; think of “Tablet” numbers like chapter numbers).” Odysseus encounters Polyphemus the Cyclops in Book 9 of The Odyssey (see http://www.theoi.com/Text/HomerOdyssey9.html; from line 105 to the end). Your paper should:
a) Compare Gilgamesh and Odysseus as to their heroic qualities, noting similarities and differences, using specific examples from the epics.

b) Summarize what this indicates about differences between ancient Mesopotamian and Greek cultures in their ideals and expectations.

c) From this comparison, suggest ways that current cultural ideals and expectations shape modern notions about role models and heroes.

Confucius and Aristotle on Virtue. Write an essay comparing these two (2) ancient thinkers on the concept of virtue or good ethical character and conduct. Stay focused on the issue; keep any biographical or other information short or limited. As much as possible, analyze their writings (in translation, of course), using Confucius’ Analects (at http://classics.mit.edu/Confucius/analects.html ) and Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (at http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/nicomachaen.html ). Your paper should:
a) Compare the teachings of Confucius and Aristotle on what constitutes virtue or good ethical character and conduct, noting similarities and differences in specific ideas or emphasis.

b) Consider what your findings suggest about differences between ancient Chinese and ancient Greek culture.

c) From this comparison, suggest ideas of virtue that can apply to ethics in a modern setting, such as a diverse workplace.

Comparing Sculptures of Ancient India and Greece. Write an essay comparing the way gods and humans were depicted in sculpture in ancient India and Greece, and identify the cultural values and ideals that these art works reflect in each case. Your paper should:
a) Using specific examples, compare the way gods and people were depicted in the sculptures of ancient India and Greece, noting similarities and differences.

b) Identify the cultural values and ideals that these art works reflect for each society.

c) From this comparison, suggest a modern situation of artistic expression and the ways it reflects or counters prevailing cultural values.

Comparing Ancient Skeptics. Write an essay comparing Lucretius and Wang Chong (=Wang Ch’ung), skeptical philosophers of ancient Rome and China. They were skeptical about popular religious and spiritual beliefs and widely-held superstitions. Lucretius was an Epicurean philosopher of Roman culture (Chapter 6). Wang Ch’ung was a thinker in ancient Chinese culture (Chapter 7). Focus your comparison on their writings as found at http://www.humanistictexts.org/lucretius.htm and http://www.humanistictexts.org/wangchung.htm#On Not Flying to Heaven. Your paper should:
a) Using examples from their writings, compare these two (2) thinkers on their views about specific subjects and on their approach in explaining and expressing their skepticism.

b) From this comparison, identify popular beliefs in each culture that seem similar and those that seem different.

c) From this comparison, suggest any modern situation in which materialist skeptics confront spiritual and religious beliefs, and comment on the considerations of free expression and cultural respect.

Comparing Ancient Male Rulers. Take any two (2) of these rulers and write an essay comparing them: Ramses II, Shihuangdi, Constantine, Ashoka, Pericles, or Charlemagne. Select rulers from different cultures. You may also propose (for approval or not) a ruler not listed. Avoid lengthy quoting or lengthy close paraphrasing from biographical sources. Make it YOUR comparative analysis. Your paper should:
a) Compare the two (2) rulers in terms of their situation and methods of rule and their apparent ideals and practices, noting similarities and differences. Use specific examples.

b) Consider what your study suggests about the cultures over which they ruled, identifying any similarities and differences between the cultures.

c) From this comparison, suggest lessons about different types of effective leadership in the world of modern business and / or modern politics.

Comparing Ancient Female Rulers. Compare the Tang Empress Wu Zetian (also known as Empress Wu or as Wu Zhao; ruled China around 690-705 AD) with either the Pharaoh Cleopatra (ruled Egypt around 51-31 BC) or the Pharaoh Hatshepsut (ruled Egypt around 1478-1458 BC). You may also propose (for approval or not) a female ruler not listed. Avoid lengthy quoting or lengthy close paraphrasing from biographical sources. Make it YOUR comparative analysis. Your paper should:
a) Compare the two (2) rulers in terms of their situation and ascent to power, their methods of rule, and their achievements and resourcefulness, noting similarities and differences. Use specific examples.

b) Consider what your study suggests about the cultures over which they ruled, identifying any similarities and differences between the cultures.

c) From this comparison, suggest lessons about different types of effective leadership by a female in the world of modern business and / or modern politics.

Other topic choice using a comparative approach (proposed by student or instructor) and approved by the professor and supported by the grading rubric.

The Project Paper will be graded on:

The level to which the instructions were followed for the paper generally and for the specific topic.
The establishment of a clear thesis about your topic.
The adequacy and relevance of information, examples, and details which support the general thesis.
Covering each part of the topic as instructed, including the comparisons, the consideration of ancient cultural differences, and the reflection on lessons for modern society or the modern workplace.
The quality of your research and your persuasiveness using critical reasoning.
The use and acknowledgement of a minimum of three (3) required references (the class textbook plus at least two (2) other quality academic sources) documented using the APA style -including both the use of a proper References list and the use of proper in-text citations.
Adherence to standard rules of grammar, punctuation, paragraphing, and mechanics, and general clarity of presentation.

Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements:

Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides. Both in-text citations and a References list are required. Citations and references must follow APA style format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions specific to the selected topic. (Note: Students can find APA style materials located in the course shell for guidance).
Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required page length. For our purposes, you may omit any abstract page.
The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:

Explain how key social, cultural, and artistic contributions contribute to historical changes.
Explain the importance of situating a society’s cultural and artistic expressions within a historical context.
Examine the influences of intellectual, religious, political, and socio-economic forces on social, cultural, and artistic expressions.
Identify major historical developments in world cultures during the eras of antiquity to the Renaissance.
Use technology and information resources to research issues in the study of world cultures.
Write clearly and concisely about world cultures using proper writing mechanics.

Blake’s Art

Blake’s Art

“Michael Phillips demonstrates William Blake’s printing process, explaining how it relates to his work as a poet and artist.”

Blake’s illustrations of “The Lamb” (Songs of Innocence) and “The Tyger” (Songs of Experience):

 

Other Blake artwork can be found at The William Blake Archive (Links to an external site.)—————-

This video will give you some insight into Blake’s social activism: Blake’s Radicalism (Links to an external site.).

The video I am commenting on is “William Blake’s Radicalism (Links to an external site.).”————————-

Reading Discussion 3

Read and annotate the texts for this week; then, respond to the questions below and participate in the discussion:

INITIAL POST 

  1. Select two counterpart poems (side by side in the handout) from Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience, and focus on the speakers in the poems. Compare the speakers (age, attitudes, emotions, etc.). Cite and analyze specific lines from the poems in your comparison.
  2. Use one symbolism or allusion concept (from Ch. 17 in our literature textbook or the “Symbolism” lecture) to identify themes in Keats’s “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” OR Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress.” Highlight the concept in bold.

Length: One page (250 words) total

Respond in a structured, focused response. This isn’t a free-write in which you just jot down thoughts. Write clear, grammatical sentences, in coherent paragraphs, and use an appropriate tone. Your response should show that you are familiar with the texts. Do not offer a long summary or background information unless it is related to the question.

RESPONSE POST 

Respond to at least one classmate’s post with a thoughtful comment. You are not limited to praise or agreement. If something needs to be pointed out, do it in a polite but clear way. Avoid irrelevant comments; focus on the texts and the classmate’s ideas. Avoid vague comments like “I agree” or “Good work.”

Note: Avoid posting blank or “test” posts. If you are unclear about the instructions or having trouble, contact me before posting.

Discuss Blake’s use of auditory imagery in the poems, and cite one example.

Discuss Blake’s use of auditory imagery in the poems, and cite one example.

Blake’s work shows a constant awareness of the ironies of publishing “songs” in written form—publishing poems that lay claim to an oral culture in a series of elaborately visual engravings. This awareness reflects the general Romantic preoccupation with the possibility of capturing in writing the rhythms, immediacy, and spontaneity of the spoken human voice. Blake seems, if not pessimistic, at least dubious about such a possibility, as can be seen in his Introduction to Songs of Innocence. Here, a child gives a wandering bard three commands: first to play his pipe, second to sing his songs, and third to write them. This progression may imply a decline, from the purity of music (without linguistic meaning), to orality (bound by meaning but still spontaneous and fleeting), to literacy (without need for human presence and perhaps less personal). The speaker’s pen, ambiguously, “stain[s] the water clear”; thus the image simultaneously implies both a purification (to “stain” it “clear”) and a corruption (to “stain” the “clear” water). On which process does the emphasis lie? Is writing part of the descent into experience?

Blake wrote in an era of great social and political upheaval. The democratic ideals of the French Revolution of 1789—the year of the first publication of Songs of Innocence—undoubtedly influenced him. But in politics Blake aligned with no particular system or idealism; he speaks always for the primacy of the individual and the imagination. Blake did attach importance to particular social reforms: one might extrapolate some of these from a poem such as “London,” depicting great suffering and oblivious social institutions, or one might consider Blake’s use of the plights of innocent children in a whole range of poems such as “Holy Thursday.” But a reading of Blake as social critic should always keep in mind the transcendent, humane values of the imagination and of the self-unrestricted by narrow social convention; for these values formed the core of his moral code. This code stringently opposes an impersonal, conventional transcendence, and rejects the consolation of a life after this world—both of which are offered by the Church. See in particular the irony of “The Little Black Boy” for evidence of this last point.

What were (and are) the effects of Blake’s mode of publishing his poems with handcrafted colored engravings?

Blake is somewhat misnamed as a poet; he is perhaps better called a craftsman or artisan, and is widely studied and valued as a visual artist. To be understood fully his poems must be considered as material artifacts. The color and composition of surrounding images can deeply change our stance on a poem. (You might find an edition of Blake containing his images in color and test out this hypothesis on “The Nurse’s Song.”) We should also recognize that such an arduous publication process helped condemn Blake to relative obscurity during his own lifetime. Poems universally known today would have been read by very, very few of Blake’s contemporaries.

What do you believe is the overall impact that information inaccuracy in social media and publicly available information platforms (TV, Radio, internet) has on society?

Please review the following videos regarding the topic and then write, as a separate Word or PDF document, a one-page, double-spaced essay that answers the following questions:

 

1. What do you believe is the overall impact that information inaccuracy in social media and publicly available information platforms (TV, Radio, internet) has on society?

 

2. On a scale of 1 (the least) through 10 (the most), rate the level by which you believe people could believe false information is true. Explain why you chose the number you did.

 

3. What do you think news organizations can do to ensure they are presenting the most accurate information?

 

4. What do you think the individual can do in effectively determining whether public information is accurate? What do you think you can personally do? Explain your answer.

 

Note – I will only accept your assignment in paragraph, essay form. Do not submit your answer as bullet points or as a numbered list as you will receive a zero on the assignment. Also remember that the more you can tell me about your understanding of the topic, the greater the likelihood of a favorable grade.

 

NO PLAGIARISM!!!!!

Essay format

Answer questions

Double spaced

MLA format

In this forum, think about an issue that is relevant to your community. You can think of community beyond just geography (a professional community, interest community, etc). For example: since I am an educator, I might examine an issue in higher education, like remote proctoring technology. Since my family shares one car but we commute to work in different directions, I might think about the need for more accessible public transportation in OKC.

2 complete paragraphs nothing less

In this forum, think about an issue that is relevant to your community. You can think of community beyond just geography (a professional community, interest community, etc).  For example: since I am an educator, I might examine an issue in higher education, like remote proctoring technology. Since my family shares one car but we commute to work in different directions, I might think about the need for more accessible public transportation in OKC. Since I enjoy reading and I’m an English instructor, I might think about why graphic novels should be encouraged in literature courses. The community you choose can be, but does not have to be, geography-based.

Being as formal and as logical as you can, create a two-paragraph argument that we can follow that will help us to understand your belief in the issue.  Even though this issue is important to you, aim to be as objective as possible.  Remember, too, to be respectful of those in the class who may have views that differ from your own.

Please note: You should not choose an argument/issue that questions or debates the rights or humanity of individuals or people groups. Avoid arguments based on morals. Arguments that do not follow these guidelines will not receive credit.

When you are finished typing your argument , go back through your posting and: 1) underline the premises of your argument; and 2) highlight your conclusion in bold.

Finally, at the end of your posting, type a few sentences that comment on your argument.  Does the conclusion seem to logically follow from the premises?  Are there any logical holes or fallacies in your argument?  How might you improve your argument?

Focus on a contemporary ethical issue, and you will apply ideas from throughout the course to reach an ethical stance on it.

To this point in the class we have focused on the study of ethics from ancient times through the Enlightenment period, and in upcoming lessons we will continue with this historical approach into modern times. This week, however, you will begin working on a multistep assignment that will focus on a contemporary ethical issue, and you will apply ideas from throughout the course to reach an ethical stance on it. This assignment will consist of four main pieces.

• Topic Selection: See directions below (Week 3)

• Academic Research: (Week 4)

• Introduction, Background, and Ethical Challenges: (Week 5)

• Solutions and Conclusion: (Week 6)

• Presentation: (Week 7)

For more details, consult the Ethics and Contemporary Issues Project Overview.

As a reminder, here are the possible topics for your project.

• Changing the names of schools or taking down statues named after controversial historical figures

• Using race or ethnicity as a factor in hiring decisions or college admissions

• “Canceling” people or organizations who have made controversial or insensitive remarks

• Encouraging businesses to become more politically active

• Allowing people who have undergone gender reassignment to participate in competitive sports

• Providing people with disabilities reasonable accommodations in the workplace

• Teaching critical race theory or the 1619 Project in schools

• Compelling private businesses to serve customers they do not wish to

• Debating the merits of various immigration policies, such as open borders, the building of walls, and so on

• Doing away with cash bail for many criminal offenses

• Eliminating harassment in the workplace

• Reallocating money from the police to other city agencies and services

• Reforming or eliminating the Electoral College

• Implementing a wealth tax on millionaires and billionaires who pay little or no income tax

 

 

• Forgiving student loans or making college tuition free

• Giving everyone a universal basic income

• Requiring voters to provide identification

This week you will begin by choosing your topic. You will complete this assignment by answering the following questions in complete sentences and submitting them in a Word document.

• What is your topic?

• Why did you choose it?

• What ethical dilemmas does your topic raise?

• Based on what you have learned about ethics so far, how do you imagine some of the famous ethicists of the past, such as Aristotle, Aquinas, or Locke, would have to say about your topic?

Finally, find one good contemporary source related to your topic choice. Ideally, this will be a scholarly source from a journal, but it may also be a good-quality source from a contemporary periodical publication as well. Provide the full reference for this source in APA style, followed by a quick summary of a few sentences written in your own words.

ETHC445 Ethics and Contemporary Issues Project Topic Selection

Criteria Ratings Pts

Introduction: Response explains which topic was chosen and why it was chosen using complete sentences.

This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.

10 pts

Ethical Dilemmas: Response discusses at least one potential ethical dilemma related to the topic.

This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.

10 pts

Ethical Theories: Response discusses at least one ethical theory or ethical theorist relevant to the topic.

This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.

10 pts

Quality Source: Provides summary and full reference in APA style for a relevant source.

This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.

20 pts

Total Points: 50

Choose a single scene (or sequence) from one of the films: ○ Jaws ○ Baby Driver

VERVIEW: A brief (approximately 2 pages, double spaced) paper, critiquing and

evaluating a scene from a film.

Instructions:

Choose a single scene (or sequence) from one of the films: ○ Jaws ○ Baby Driver

Briefly describe the scene and its impact/effect on the film as a whole, explaining whether or not you feel the scene was effective. Then support your point of view by giving specific examples from the scene.

You will most likely have to re-watch the scene to provide the specific moments/lines/actions/etc to support your point of view.

While writing composing this essay, make sure to use the concept of Screenplay by Syd Field (1979).

Discuss the influence of the selected social cohesion dimension on the average life expectancy for the selected country’s population. 

– 1 page, APA format, in-text citation, references include ( minimum of 2)

– Topic: You have been assigned as a global health consultant to discuss the SDOH, social cohesion component, as it is applied to one low/middle-income country.

1. Select one low/middle-income country. Provide a basic profile with information relevant to the discussion topic.

2. Select one of the dimensions of social cohesion, including 1) belonging vs. isolation, 2) inclusion vs. exclusion, 3) participation vs. non-involvement, 4) recognition vs. rejection, and 5) legitimacy vs. illegitimacy. (McCracken, 1998)

3 Discuss the influence of the selected social cohesion dimension on the average life expectancy for the selected country’s population.